First collection

weddingConsider the Simone Handbag Museum, which opened last year on Garosugil in Bagstage, a multi-story building designed to resemble a bag and to showcase local artisans and designs from its own brand 0914, alongside its museum collection. Or consider Seoul Fashion Week, which ended on March 30, having featured an array of established and upcoming designers such as Shin Jang Kyoung, Kimseoryong, and Munsoo Kwon.

The latter launched his first collection in New York in 2012 after working for a number of big brands, including Helmut Lang.

Though Kwon is based in Gangnam, he also has a New York showroom, indicative of the way Korean designers are beginning to branch out in the US market. Indeed, at this year’s New York Fashion Week, Concept Korea, a showcase for Korean designers launched in 2010 to promote Korean fashion designers and help them break into the US, proved one of the most colourful highlights of the week, attracting guests such as the British pop singer Neon Hitch, who modelled one of Lie Sang Bong’s glamorous fluffy white jackets.

On display was work from six leading designers, including Lie Sang Bong, Son Jung Wan and Choi Bo Ko and Kye by Kathleen Kye, a Central St Martins graduate whose work can be found in Harvey Nichols in London and in Gangnam in the Daily Projects shop.

“Korean consumers like to follow fashion trends,” Kye says. “My hope is that Koreans can express their personality with a more free-minded and witty style, like in the UK and Japan.”

“K-pop became famous, and now the attention is moving to K-fashion,” says Lie Sang Bong. “K-fashion is important because it can communicate Korean emotions and feelings throughout the world.”

Tags:

Read Users' Comments (0)

Shop

weddingYet for the retailers themselves, fast fashion can be more of a mixed bag. The business model boasts incredible unit-level economics — stores cost little to open, and the inventory turns over incredibly fast, with new merchandise brought in weekly or even daily. Yet, with its focus on low prices, the model also encourages consumers to be more loyal to price than brand or shop, leading to a race to the bottom in which retailers must constantly lower prices — and see their margins reduced.

There’s also the question of where these cheap goods come from and under what conditions, and by whom, they’re manufactured. In the U.S., where consumers buy on average 64 new items of clothing each year, the fast fashion industry has come under scrutiny and been the subject of books such as Elizabeth Cline’s 2012 exposé, “Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion,” which chronicles the possible environmental and social damage fast fashion can cause.

May the cheapest skirt win.

For existing Australian retailers, there is a more immediate kind of damage to keep an eye on. H&M will compete directly with privately owned retailers such as Ice and Cotton On, and also with the likes of Country Road (ASX: CTY), as H&M offers similar office-appropriate outfits at far lower prices.

H&M stores also poses a threat to Premier Investments (ASX: PMV) which has lately seen success with its fast-fashion concepts Dotti and Portmans. That’s to say nothing of older, legacy retailers such as David Jones (ASX: DJS) and Myer (ASX: MYR).

If history repeats itself, and H&M performs as well as it has in other markets, these retailers are right to be shaking in their platform studded booties.

Looking for some investment ideas not in the fickle fashion category? look no further! Get two under-the-radar ideas now, including names, codes, and a full investment analysis in our brand new FREE report, Two Small Cap Superstars.

Tags:

Read Users' Comments (0)

Proposal

Fil-Am wins in US reality TV dating game show ‘The Bachelor’.

A Filipino-American woman emerged as the winner of the 17th season of the US reality television dating game show “The Bachelor” when she won the heart of the man who was looking for a girlfriend.
An article on Asian Journal said 26-year-old half-Filipina Catherine Ligaya Mejia Giudici accepted the proposal of Sean Lowe, and bested 25 other girls for the way to his heart.Giudici is a graphic designer and blogger from Seattle, Washington.The article noted that she is the daughter of one of the trustees of the Filipino-American National Historical Society in Seattle, Cynthia Mejia-Giudici.

On the other hand, her father, Carey “Trip” Guidici, is a journalist of Scottish and Swiss-Italian descent who was also a former editor-in-chief of Northwest Asia Week.
An estimated 10 million viewers watched Giudici accept Lowe’s proposal before they climbed “atop an elephant under a Thailand sunset” during the “The Bachelor” two-hour season finale on Monday.

“I miss you every time we have to say goodbye. I don’t want to say goodbye anymore,” Texas insurance agent Lowe, 28, said during his proposal to Giudici.He also said he and Giudici plan to have a televised wedding though he said there is still no definite date for their wedding.
“A marriage follows a proposal. We don’t have a date yet but we have decided that it would be cool since our relationship started and cultivated on a TV show we’ll have our wedding on a TV show. ABC will cover the wedding,” Lowe said.
Entertainment site E! Online also came out with some trivia about Giudici in an article, noting that the “The Bachelor” winner is “not creative,” a writer aside from being a graphic designer; vegetarian, and athletic.
The story noted Giudici’s explanation on the claims that she is “not creative.

“Usually when someone claims to be creative, the term loses a bit of its value. I won’t say I am creative because that is for you to judge. But I will say that I like to create,” she said.Giudici also writes a weekly column for Seattleite.com called “Meatless Mondays,” in which she gives recommendations about restaurants that serve good vegan food.

Her being a vegetarian was already noted in the show, but the reason she chose the lifestyle was because of a trip to Kenya in Africa, where she ate “copious amounts of exotic—and not so exotic—meat on a trip to Kenya” that afterwards left her “craving anything and everything without a face.”Lastly, running more than nine miles is apparently no sweat for Giudici, who earlier this month ran the Seattle Hot Chocolate 15K in 1 hour, 36 minutes, and 16 seconds.

Tags:

Read Users' Comments (0)

Page 1 of 212